Monday, August 29, 2011

Wild Wildlife: High-Altitude Pollination




I was in Boulder, briefly, this past week, and I was not eaten by a mountain lion (something I was, I admit, a little afraid of). In fact, I saw no large mammals at all (apart from people), which was no hardship at all, really, when you consider that most of them could kill you. I was a little more frustrated by the cruel, taunting attitudes of the local birds, who either refused to stand conveniently next to measuring devices so that I could determine whether they were ravens or crows or else hid in trees, cheeping like finches or crossbills or who knows what and staying determinedly concealed by leaves.

Insects were my friends, though; they were so focused on nectar that they couldn’t have cared less if I took pictures of their pollinating activities. It made me wonder whether there’s anything different about pollination at high altitudes, the way there are different rules for baking; and then I wondered if all plants in the Denver/Boulder area consider themselves members of the Mile-High Club.

If so, they’re not telling…


{A note: I do write all text and take all pictures. Please do not reproduce either without my permission.}

3 comments:

Anca Vlasopolos said...

These two photos would make a great screen-saver for wintry days. Eaten by a mountain lion? You crack me up. Here the hummers have finally discovered the nectar feeder.

Lucy said...

Birds are not delightful in their habits, despite their pretty appearances. I understand doves fight to the death, despite their reputation for peace, and that Robins are particularly fierce about their territories.

biobabbler said...

Such a short post, yet so delightful. Also glad you did not become a mountain lion snack. =) LOVE that last shot, such an unexpected perspective, and v. nice lighting. Emphasizes the pattern. YUM.

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